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Jump-starting the green jobs transition

"Bridging the Great Green Divide". One interesting report about jobs in OECD countries. Green jobs.


This 2023 edition of Job Creation and Local Economic Development fills a gap by examining the implications of the green transition on local labour markets with new internationally comparable metrics.


The year 2022 set a number of alarming records as a result of climate change and environmental degradation: the warmest years on record in many countries, widespread draught took its toll on nature and economic activities, and contamination of our environment and air continues. Because of all that, the green transition is gaining momentum.


Consumer preferences are also shifting. And the market and governments are responding: new regulations on construction or production processes, taxes on carbon emissions or reforms of land use planning.


All these will change the way people live, work, produce and consume. And “green talent” is needed, meaning workers with the skills that a greener economy requires.



Around 18% of workers in the OECD have jobs with a significant share of green tasks that directly help improve environmental sustainability or reducing greenhouse gas emission. However, the share of those “green-task” jobs differs across regions, ranging from 7% to more than 35%. This means that while the green transition is a global megatrend, its labour market impact is inherently local.


Click at the image below for the full online version of it, including executive summary, tables and graphs ("Read online")



This jobs report would be of special interest for forward looking governments. Specially after the European Green Deal and the US Inflation Reduction Act





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“Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.”

“I am among those who think that science has great beauty”

Madame Marie Curie (1867 - 1934) Chemist & physicist. French, born Polish.

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